From Serving Our Country to Serving Your Patients

From Serving Our Country to Serving Your Patients

On Monday, July 4th, Americans will gather with friends and family to celebrate our nation and to honor the sacrifices of the men and women who have served or continue to serve our country. UBC’s Senior Clinical Nurse Educator, Holly Kingston, is one of those individuals who, for more than eight years, made the sacrifice to care for those protecting our nation.

In honor of Independence Day, we asked Holly to share her experience as a nurse in the military and how she utilizes that experience in her current role as a Clinical Nurse Educator.

Q. Did you become a nurse while in the military or did you join after?
A.
I joined right after completing my BSN in 2003.

Q. What branch of the military did you serve in?
A.
I was commissioned as an Officer in the United States Air Force in 2003 and was honorably discharged as a Captain in 2011 upon completing my commitment.

Q. Where were you stationed?  
A.
I was stationed at various places in the United States, such as Florida and South Carolina. I also spent three years at the Royal Air Force Base in Lakenheath, United Kingdom. I really appreciated my time in the UK because I got to experience a different care culture. One of my colleagues was a British nurse, and she would always make patients a cup of tea after they woke up from surgery. That was very touching to witness.

Q. What areas did you work in?
A.
In the Air Force, I had the opportunity to work in many areas such as family practice, pediatrics, Post Anesthesia Care Unit, Same Day Surgery and Flight Medicine. Flight Medicine is a practice which treats any Air Force personnel flying or maintaining planes, as well as their families. I would also monitor and care for those who were not cleared for flying status.

Q. What was the most rewarding aspect of working as a nurse in the Air Force?
A. 
I was very proud to be part of an elite team and to give back to our nation. Some of my most memorable moments during my time as a nurse manager of the Flight Medicine clinic were building relationships and caring for our flyers and their families – it’s when I felt closest to the mission.

Q. How has your military background influenced your work as a Senior Clinical Nurse Educator at UBC?
A.
As a nurse in the field, I collaborate with more than 20 pharmaceutical representatives and cover physicians’ offices across the entire state of South Carolina. The military refined my ability to accept and adapt to change in all situations and to put service before self.  Also, because I moved frequently, it taught me the value of building meaningful relationships with my team and my patients.

Q. What do you find most exciting about your role as a Clinical Nurse Educator?
A. 
I love my role as a Clinical Nurse Educator because I help bring breakthrough innovative therapies to patients. These new medications are changing the landscape of how doctors prescribe. For some patients, they have never had an effective treatment or any treatment options available until now. I believe the innovation in technology and the biologics coming to market are very exciting for the future of the healthcare industry as a whole.

To learn more about UBC’s Field Nursing service offering, click here.